Currency Art By Curtis William Readel

 

Curtis William Readel was born in Iowa in 1981.  He received a BFA from the University of Iowa in 2004 and a MFA with an emphasis in Printmaking from Northern Illinois University in the spring of 2009.  Curtis is actively involved in developing a large body of work that addresses themes and ideas related to historical and contemporary socio-political issues.  Through manipulated and distorted images, his work creates metaphors for deteriorated morality, self-indulgence, corruption, and societal downfall utilizing traditional and current techniques of printmaking, collage and drawing.  He is represented by Packer Schopf Galley in Chicago, IL and the Jonas Gallery of Brussels.

Can check Curtis out HERE.

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Artist/Mosaicist/Muralist/ Manny Vega

Manny Vega street art NYC Guys on Walls, Part III: Stik, Blek le Rat, Icy & Sot, Gilf!, LNY, Cost & Enx, Vexta and Manny Vega

Manny Vega in East Harlem

Photo by Dani Mozeson, Tara Murray and Lois Stavsky

Manny Vega is an American painter, illustrator, printmaker, muralist, mosaicist, and set and costume designer. His work portrays the history and traditions of the African Diaspora that exist in the United States, the Caribbean, and Latin America.

Born in the South Bronx, New York, Vega studied at the High School of Art and Design in New York City from 1970-1974. He joined the artist collective Taller Boricua in 1979 where he studied through 1986. While there he was also a pupil of legendary Harlem printmaker Robert Blackburn at his Printmaking Workshop from 1980-1990.

Among Vega’s public art projects are a mosaic mural at the Pregones Theater in the Bronx, a mosaic mural portrait of Julia De Burgos in East Harlem, a series of mosaic panels for the 110 street train station, also in East Harlem, as well as a series of painted murals throughout New York City.

For many years, Vega has been teaching visual arts for organizations such as El Museo del Barrio, Arts Connection, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Caribbean Cultural Center. He has exhibited extensively in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Brazil.

Vega has created set designs and costumes for DanceBrazil and The American Place Theater.

Since 1984, Manny has been traveling to Salvador, Bahia in Brazil, where he has been initiated into the Afro Brazilian temple known as “Ile Iya Omi Ase Iya Masse”. As a member of the temple, his creative talents have been utilized to create some of the most elaborate ritual costumes and accessories. His work in this medium has been documented by the Fowler Museum of UCLA, the Smithsonian, as well as Dartmouth College. This body of work has been documented in the book, Beads, Body, and Soul: Art and Light in the Yoruba Universe,[1]as well as the book, The Yoruba Artist.[2]

His current focus is to create a series of mosaic projects, based on study of classic Byzantine mosaic fabrication, to adopt this style to modern day imagery, which he calls “Byzantine Hip Hop”.

Can check out Manny’s website HERE.

 

 

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Tattooed Model: Lepa Dinis

Tattooed model Lepa Dinis featured on Diabolical Rabbit® Continue reading

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We Find Interesting: Stephen Hawking’s Life After Death

I think the brain is like a program in the mind, which is like a computer,” Hawking said last week during an appearance at the Cambridge Film Festival, The Telegraph reported. “So it’s theoretically possible to copy the brain on to a computer and so provide a form of life after death.”

He acknowledged that such a feat lies “beyond our present capabilities,” adding that “the conventional afterlife is a fairy tale for people afraid of the dark.”

Hawking, 71, made the remarks in conjunction with the premiere of a new documentary about his life.

He has spoken previously about what he calls the “fairy story” of heaven and the afterlife. Likening the human brain to a computer whose components will fail, he said, “There is no heaven or afterlife for broken-down computers.”

Some people are actively working to develop technology that would permit the migration of brain functions into a computer. Russian multi-millionaire Dmitry Itskov, for one, hopes someday to upload the contents of a brain into a lifelike robot body as part of his 2045 Initiative, The New York Times reported recently.

A separate research group, called the Brain Preservation Foundation, is working to develop a process to preserve the brain along with its memories, emotions and consciousness. Called chemical fixation and plastic embedding, the process involves converting the brain into plastic, carving it up into tiny slices, and then reconstructing its three-dimensional structure in a computer.

Article courtesy of Huffington Post By 

Article can be found HERE.

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Ian Reyes Super Model Heroines Series

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Female Superheroes

Photographer Ian Reyes showcasing super models in this super model heroine series. The models are in famous comic book character shirts such as Super Man, Flash, Incredible Hulk etc.

Female Superheroes

Want more? check Ian Reyes out HERE.

 

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Cover We Like: Miley Cyrus Rolling Stone

Miley Cyrus on the upcoming October issue of Rolling Stone.

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Carved Book Sculptures By Kelly Campbell

literary artwork

literary artwork

literary artwork

literary artwork

These awesome popular literary carved book sculptures are done by the artist known as Kelly Campbell. Kelly has carved out parts and images from each of these titles and rearranged them in wonderful displays.

literary artwork

literary artwork

literary artwork

literary artwork

 

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Realistic Illustrations By Karla Mialynne

realistic art

realistic art

realistic art

Amazing works by Karla Mialynne her realistic illustrations are done by using Prismacolor colored pencils, displaying each color she used lined up beside each of her drawings. Karla’s drawings are incredibly detailed and could easily be mistaken for a real photo.

realistic art

realistic art

realistic art

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